Monthly Archives: January 2016

Move a little, learn a lot

The Feldenkrais Method: Move a little, learn a lot.

  • Move a little
  • Learn – re-wire, re-charge, re-fresh – a lot.

Learning is whole body thing and a whole life possibility. Whatever your age, The Feldenkrais Method offers opportunities to re-fresh, re-charge and re-wire. As recent research produces more evidence of neural plasticity, we know more about how The Feldenkrais Method leads to benefits for all. Developing connections, intuitively, experientially…for greater ease, grace and power.

Since the publication of the book Thinking Fast and Slow by nobel laureate Daniel Kahnemann, there has been a lot of coverage of his research. This seems to show that most of what we regard as ‘thinking’ is fast thinking: it’s reactive and based on implicit assumptions. Good if you want speed. And quite a lot of the time it serves us well. Over the years we form habits of reacting. However, if you want to change, do things differently, it’s slow thinking that must happen.

When this is applied to movement it’s easy to see the difference between fast and slow. In the movements that we make, the ping ping ping of information and instruction, of energy and flow is happening off the radar. Light comes into the eye, pings a response in the optical nerve, the neurones fire in response. From light to eye, impulse to brain, electrical charge to neurones, twitch in muscle fibres. Ping. Ping . Ping. Split second stuff. In those moments we are not knowingly making choices. This is how it is most of the time. Stimulus leads to response, which seems to just happen. So far, so automatic. And so helpful when it allows ease and speed.

But what happens when we want more ease or speed, when we want to do things differently?

Then we need to pause. We need slow movement. This is at the heart of The Feldenkrais Method.

Decades before Kahnemann and co. did their research about how we think, Moshe Feldenkrais was, in effect, putting these principles into practice.

In the The Feldenkrais Method we are offered alternative ways of moving. A session of Feldenkrais -whether it is an Awareness through Movement ‘lesson’ or an individual 1:1 with a practitioner (Functional Integration) – is about slow thinking. We re-fresh and recharge through slow moving.

Whenever we make a move quickly our habits are likely to be in charge.

Slow down. Pause. Make a move with awareness and attention. Experiment. Explore. Rest. Allow all those neural pathways to absorb this possibility. Allow your body and your muscle memory, your brain and your connections to remember. Now you have the possibility of moving differently. Moving with greater ease and grace, with increased flexibility and strength.

It turns out that following this approach, not only can our bodies move with ease, but ‘lessons’ can be deeply relaxing too. As you focus awareness on the body and movements, you may well find that your internal dialogue calms. At the end of one of Veronica’s workshops, it’s not unusual to leave in a deeply relaxed, almost meditative state.

Ease for body and mind.

Slow thinking – slow moving

Re-freshing – re-wiring

Exploring Extending

Ease Grace Power Strength

Awareness through Movement

Join us when you can. Move a little, learn a lot.

Looking, moving…and The Feldenkrais Method

Hand * Eye * Balance

We are highly visual beings. Gifted with sight, it is our vision that often directs our movements. Just how powerfully this connection is becomes evident when you try a Feldenkrais workshop. In one of the lessons which I’ve experienced I simply lay on the floor and moved my eyes. 40 minutes. Just moving eyes. Or at least the instructions were about exploring movements of the eye. Because, as I’ve learned, nothing moves in isolation. Everything’s connected.

 

So often we’ve explored themes on movement, such as sitting, or themes exploring movements (like the most recent workshop (lightness, freedom, flow), or focused on a particular aspect of our skeleton, the pelvis or the spine. In each of these different approaches, we have often found that we explore a movement one way. We move to the comfortable limits, well within our range. Then we might engage the eyes in a particular way. We might be guided to look in a particular direction as we make a move and discover that the move feels different. Further exploration with looking in different directions might be part of the lesson. Then we might find that somehow, the movement is easier, lighter, we are able to move further in an effortless way. It seems that something almost magical happens when we work with the connections between eye and movement.

 

This magical thing may be related to the power of the visual. I’ve heard it said that 80% of our brain activity is related to visual activity. Once we start exploring the implications of this, it is interesting to investigate how our eye movements link to other movements. How closing our eyes affects our brain activity. How we can improve our intuitive response and move with ease through developing confidence in our balance. Hands, eyes, whole body moving in balance. Here’s to more of that in 2016.

 

Hand* Eye * Balance is our January Workshop in Romiley, at the Life Centre on 29th January from 1pm to 4pm.

Bookings now being taken.

Maybe see you there?

 

Looking and Moving and The Feldenkrais Method

Hand * Eye* Balance and Awareness through Movement
We are highly visual beings. Gifted with sight, it is our vision that often directs our movements. Just how powerfully this connection is becomes evident when you try a Feldenkrais workshop. In one of the lessons which I’ve experienced I simply lay on the floor and moved my eyes. 40 minutes. Just moving eyes. Or at least the instructions were about exploring movements of the eye. Because, as I’ve learned, nothing moves in isolation. Everything’s connected.
So often we’ve explored themes on movement, such as sitting, or themes exploring movements (like the most recent workshop (lightness, freedom, flow), or focused on a particular aspect of our skeleton, the pelvis or the spine. In each of these different approaches, we have often found that we explore a movement one way. We move to the comfortable limits, well within our range. Then we might engage the eyes in a particular way. We might be guided to look in a particular direction as we make a move and discover the move feels different. Further exploration with looking in different directions might be part of the lesson. Then we might find that somehow, the movement is easier, lighter, we are able to move further in an effortless way. It seems that something almost magical happens when we work with the connections between eye and movement.
This magical thing may be related to the power of the visual. I’ve heard it said that 80% of our brain activity is related to visual activity. Once we start exploring the implications of this, it is interesting to investigate how our eye movements link to other movements. How closing our eyes affects our brain activity. How we can improve our intuitive response and move with ease through developing confidence in our balance. Hands, eyes, whole body moving in balance. Here’s to more of that in 2016.

Restoring balance…

Today, there’ll be no talk of resolutions. Each day, another opportunity. So here’s an opportunity for January.

On Friday 29th January, Veronica will travel over to Romiley and talk us through some gentle movements. Through movement, awareness and real experiential learning that leads to real change. This is learning that is both mind boggling and subtle. Seemingly about the body, and yet allowing the mind to experience a deep meditative state. Brain and body re-wiring, balance and mindfulness restored.

Bookings now being taken.